The Success and Evolution of a Urological "Boot Camp" for Newly Appointed UK Urology Registrars: Incorporating Simulation, Nontechnical Skills and Assessment.

Young, M and Kailavasan, M and Taylor, J and Cornford, P and Colquhoun, A and Rochester, M and Hanchanale, V and Somani, B and Nabi, G and Garthwaite, M and Gowda, R and Reeves, F and Rai, B and Doherty, R and Gkentzis, A and Athanasiadis, G and Patterson, J and Wilkinson, B and Myatt, A and Biyani, C S and Jain, S (2019) The Success and Evolution of a Urological "Boot Camp" for Newly Appointed UK Urology Registrars: Incorporating Simulation, Nontechnical Skills and Assessment. Journal of surgical education. ISSN 1878-7452. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

Urological training has dramatically changed in recent years. Training durations are shorter and a drive toward consultant led care has reduced trainees experience. Within the UK, approximately 50 registrars annually embark on a 5-year Urology training programme, with variable levels of basic urological experience.

OBJECTIVE

To describe a simulation programme aimed at delivering the knowledge and skills necessary to safely and effectively start working as a registrar in Urology by intensive training with a 1:1 faculty to delegate ratio.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS

Our course content mirrors the UK training syllabus for junior Urology registrars. We delivered 8 modules over a 4-day programme with a fifth day of assessments. Delegates level of urological knowledge, operative competency and confidence pre-, immediately post-training and at 3-months postcourse were assessed. Objective delegate and faculty feedback was also collected. Technical skills modules include; inguinoscrotal surgery, ureteroscopy, transurethral resection, urodynamics, and Botox administration as well as basic reconstructive and laparoscopic operative skills. "Nontechnical" skills included simulated ward round, out-patient, and emergency scenarios.

RESULTS

Feedback from delegates and faculty members has been overwhelmingly positive. We have used this feedback to tailor the content of the course for following years. An increased knowledge level (based on mean examination scores [precourse 55.5%, postcourse 70.1%]) and operative competency was observed in all skills assessed (transurethral resection of the prostate, transurethral resection of bladder tumor, Ureteroscopy, laparoscopic skills, and instrument assembly). Operative confidence was increased immediately and at 3-months postcourse.

CONCLUSIONS

Our "boot camp" course provides a realistic introduction and foundation to begin Urological practice. Being delivered at the beginning of the training scheme, prior to intensive patient exposure, registrars are in an optimum position to develop their newly acquired knowledge and skills to enhance training and intends to improve patient safety and satisfaction.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WA Patients. Primary care. Medical profession. Forensic medicine
WJ Urogenital system. Urology
Divisions: Planned IP Care > Urology
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Depositing User: Mrs Yolande Brookes
Date Deposited: 03 May 2019 12:56
Last Modified: 03 May 2019 12:56
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2070

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