Life after sepsis: an international survey of survivors to understand the post-sepsis syndrome.

Huang, Cynthia Y and Daniels, Ron and Lembo, Angie and Hartog, Christiane and O'Brien, Jim and Heymann, Thomas and Reinhart, Konrad and Nguyen, H Bryant (2019) Life after sepsis: an international survey of survivors to understand the post-sepsis syndrome. International journal for quality in health care : journal of the International Society for Quality in Health Care, 31 (3). pp. 191-198. ISSN 1464-3677.

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Official URL: https://academic.oup.com/intqhc/article-abstract/3...

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

In this study, we aim to describe the post-sepsis syndrome from the perspective of the sepsis survivors.

DESIGN AND SETTING

The study is a prospective, observational online international survey.

PARTICIPANTS

Sepsis survivors enrolled via social media from 13 September 2014 to 13 September 2016.

INTERVENTIONS

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Physiologic, physical and psychological function post-sepsis; and patient satisfaction with sepsis-centered care.

RESULTS

1731 completed surveys from 41 countries were analyzed, with 79.9% female respondents, age 47.6 ± 14.4 years. The majority of respondents (47.8%) had sepsis within the last year. Survivors reported an increase in sensory, integumentary, digestive, breathing, chest pain, kidney and musculoskeletal problems after sepsis (all P-value <0.0001). Physical functions such as daily chores, running errands, spelling, reading and reduced libido posed increased difficulty (all P-value <0.0001). Within 7 days prior to completing the survey, the survivors reported varying degrees of anxiety, depression, fatigue and sleep disturbance. Sepsis survivors reported dissatisfaction with a number of hospital support services, with up to 29.3% of respondents stating no social services support was provided for their condition.

CONCLUSIONS

Sepsis survivors suffer from a myriad of physiologic, physical and psychological challenges. Survivors overall reveal dissatisfaction with sepsis-related care, suggesting areas for improvement both in-hospital and post-discharge.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WB Practice of medicine > WB400 Intensive care
Divisions: Clinical Support > Critical Care
Clinical Support > Infection Control
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jennifer Manders
Date Deposited: 26 Jul 2019 15:53
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2019 15:53
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2258

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