Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Management in England.

Adizie, J B and Khakwani, A and Beckett, P and Navani, N and West, D and Woolhouse, I and Harden, S V (2019) Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Management in England. Clinical oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain)), 31 (10). pp. 688-696. ISSN 1433-2981. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.comz795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Official URL: https://www.clinicaloncologyonline.net/article/S09...

Abstract

AIMS

We present the first analysis of the management and outcomes of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) conducted in England using National Lung Cancer Audit data.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC in 2016 were identified. Linked datasets (including Hospital Episode Statistics, the National Radiotherapy Dataset, the Systemic Anti-Cancer Dataset, pathology reports and death certificate data) were used to categorise the treatment received. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were obtained, with survival defined from the date of diagnosis to the date of death.

RESULTS

In total, 6276 cases of stage III NSCLC were analysed: 3827 stage IIIA and 2449 stage IIIB; 1047 (17%) patients were treated with radical radiotherapy with 676 (11%) of these also receiving chemotherapy. Twenty per cent of patients with stage IIIA disease underwent surgery, with half of these also receiving chemotherapy, predominantly delivered in the adjuvant setting. Of note, 2148 (34%) patients received palliative-intent treatment and 2265 (36%) received no active anti-cancer treatment. The 1-year survival was 32.9% (37.4% for stage IIIA), with the highest survival seen for those patients receiving chemotherapy and surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

We highlight important gaps in the optimal care of patients with stage III NSCLC in England. Multimodality treatment with either surgery or radical radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy was delivered to less than one-fifth of patients, even though these regimens are considered optimal. Timely access to specialist resources and staff, the practice of effective shared decision making and challenging preconceptions have the potential to optimise management.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.comz795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: QZ Pathology. Oncology
WF Respiratory system. Respiratory medicine
Divisions: Planned IP Care > Respiratory Medicine
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 25 Sep 2019 09:15
Last Modified: 02 Oct 2019 15:27
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2411

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