3D human liver tissue from pluripotent stem cells displays stable phenotype in vitro and supports compromised liver function in vivo.

Rashidi, Hassan and Luu, Nguyet-Thin and Alwahsh, Salamah M and Ginai, Maaria and Alhaque, Sharmin and Dong, Hua and Tomaz, Rute A and Vernay, Bertrand and Vigneswara, Vasanthy and Hallett, John M and Chandrashekran, Anil and Dhawan, Anil and Vallier, Ludovic and Bradley, Mark and Callanan, Anthony and Forbes, Stuart J and Newsome, Philip N and Hay, David C (2018) 3D human liver tissue from pluripotent stem cells displays stable phenotype in vitro and supports compromised liver function in vivo. Archives of toxicology, 92 (10). pp. 3117-3129. ISSN 1432-0738. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.comz795c8c by using their Athens login IDs

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Official URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00204...

Abstract

Liver disease is an escalating global health issue. While liver transplantation is an effective mode of therapy, patient mortality has increased due to the shortage of donor organs. Developing renewable sources of human liver tissue is therefore attractive. Pluripotent stem cell-derived liver tissue represents a potential alternative to cadaver derived hepatocytes and whole organ transplant. At present, two-dimensional differentiation procedures deliver tissue lacking certain functions and long-term stability. Efforts to overcome these limiting factors have led to the building of three-dimensional (3D) cellular aggregates. Although enabling for the field, their widespread application is limited due to their reliance on variable biological components. Our studies focused on the development of 3D liver tissue under defined conditions. In vitro generated 3D tissues exhibited stable phenotype for over 1 year in culture, providing an attractive resource for long-term in vitro studies. Moreover, 3D derived tissue provided critical liver support in two animal models, including immunocompetent recipients. Therefore, we believe that our study provides stable human tissue to better model liver biology 'in the dish', and in the future may permit the support of compromised liver function in humans.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.comz795c8c by using their Athens login IDs
Subjects: WI Digestive system. Gastroenterology
Divisions: Planned IP Care > Oncology and Clinical Haematology
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Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 21 Oct 2019 08:10
Last Modified: 21 Oct 2019 08:10
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2498

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