Impact of neuroendocrine morphology on cancer outcomes and stage at diagnosis: a UK nationwide cohort study 2013-2015.

Genus, Tracey S E and Bouvier, Catherine and Wong, Kwok F and Srirajaskanthan, Rajaventhan and Rous, Brian A and Talbot, Denis C and Valle, Juan W and Khan, Mohid and Pearce, Neil and Elshafie, Mona and Reed, Nicholas S and Morgan, Eileen and Deas, Andrew and White, Ceri and Huws, Dyfed and Ramage, John (2019) Impact of neuroendocrine morphology on cancer outcomes and stage at diagnosis: a UK nationwide cohort study 2013-2015. British journal of cancer. ISSN 1532-1827. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Official URL: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41416-019-0606-3

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The diagnosis of neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) is often delayed. This first UK population-based epidemiological study of NENs compares outcomes with non-NENs to identify any inequalities.

METHODS

Age-standardised incidence rate (ASR), 1-year overall survival, hazard ratios and standardised mortality rates (SMRs) were calculated for all malignant NENs diagnosed 2013-2015 from UK national Public Health records. Comparison with non-NENs assessed 1-year overall survival (1YS) and association between diagnosis at stage IV and morphology.

RESULTS

A total of 15,222 NENs were identified, with an ASR (2013-2015 combined) of 8.6 per 100,000 (95% CI 8.5-8.7); 4.6 per 100 000 (95% CI, 4.5-4.7) for gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP) NENs. The 1YS was 75% (95% CI, 73.9-75.4) varying significantly by sex. Site and morphology were prognostic. NENs (predominantly small cell carcinomas) in the oesophagus, bladder, prostate, and female reproductive organs had a poorer outcome and were three times more likely to be diagnosed at stage IV than non-NENs.

CONCLUSION

Advanced stage at diagnosis with significantly poorer outcomes of some NENs compared with non-NENs at the same anatomical site, highlight the need for improved access to specialist services and targeted service improvement.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: QZ Pathology. Oncology
Divisions: Clinical Support > Pathology
Planned IP Care > Oncology and Clinical Haematology
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Depositing User: Mr Philip O'Reilly
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2019 13:06
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2019 13:06
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2543

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