Ethnic differences in inflammatory bowel disease: Results from the United Kingdom inception cohort epidemiology study.

Misra, Ravi and Limdi, Jimmy and Cooney, Rachel and Sakuma, Samia and Brookes, Matthew and Fogden, Edward and Pattni, Sanjeev and Sharma, Naveen and Iqbal, Tariq and Munkholm, Pia and Burisch, Johan and Arebi, Naila (2019) Ethnic differences in inflammatory bowel disease: Results from the United Kingdom inception cohort epidemiology study. World journal of gastroenterology, 25 (40). pp. 6145-6157. ISSN 2219-2840. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

The current epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the multi-ethnic United Kingdom is unknown. The last incidence study in the United Kingdom was carried out over 20 years ago.

AIM

To describe the incidence and phenotype of IBD and distribution within ethnic groups.

METHODS

Adult patients (> 16 years) with newly diagnosed IBD (fulfilling Copenhagen diagnostic criteria) were prospectively recruited over one year in 5 urban catchment areas with high South Asian population. Patient demographics, ethnic codes, disease phenotype (Montreal classification), disease activity and treatment within 3 months of diagnosis were recorded onto the Epicom database.

RESULTS

Across a population of 2271406 adults, 339 adult patients were diagnosed with IBD over one year: 218 with ulcerative colitis (UC, 64.3%), 115 with Crohn's disease (CD, 33.9%) and 6 with IBD unclassified (1.8%). The crude incidence of IBD, UC and CD was 17.0/100000, 11.3/100000 and 5.3/100000 respectively. The age adjusted incidence of IBD and UC were significantly higher in the Indian group (25.2/100000 and 20.5/100000) compared to White European (14.9/100000, = 0.009 and 8.2/100000, < 0.001) and Pakistani groups (14.9/100000, = 0.001 and 11.2/100000, = 0.007). The Indian group were significantly more likely to have extensive disease than White Europeans (52.7% 41.7%, = 0.031). There was no significant difference in time to diagnosis, disease activity and treatment.

CONCLUSION

This is the only prospective study to report the incidence of IBD in an ethnically diverse United Kingdom population. The Indian ethnic group showed the highest age-adjusted incidence of UC (20.5/100000). Further studies on dietary, microbial and metabolic factors that might explain these findings in UC are underway.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WI Digestive system. Gastroenterology
Divisions: Ambulatory Care > Day Care Unit
Planned IP Care > Gastroentrology
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Mrs Yolande Brookes
Date Deposited: 08 Nov 2019 15:47
Last Modified: 08 Nov 2019 15:47
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2575

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