Immunological mechanisms underpinning faecal microbiota transplantation for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

Quraishi, M N and Shaheen, W and Oo, Y H and Iqbal, T H (2020) Immunological mechanisms underpinning faecal microbiota transplantation for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Clinical and experimental immunology, 199 (1). pp. 24-38. ISSN 1365-2249. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.comz795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Official URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/c...

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic gastrointestinal disease that results from a dysregulated immune response against specific environmental triggers in a genetically predisposed individual. Increasing evidence has indicated a causal role for changes in gut microbiota (dysbiosis) contributing to this immune-mediated intestinal inflammation. These mechanisms involve dysregulation of multiple facets of the host immune pathways that are potentially reversible. Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the transfer of processed stool from a healthy donor into an individual with an illness. FMT has shown promising results in both animal model experiments and clinical studies in IBD in the resolution of intestinal inflammation. The underlying mechanisms, however, are unclear. Insights from these studies have shown interactions between modulation of dysbiosis via changes in abundances of specific members of the gut microbial community and changes in host immunological pathways. Unravelling these causal relationships has promising potential for a translational therapy role to develop targeted microbial therapies and understand the mechanisms that underpin IBD aetiopathogenesis. In this review, we discuss current evidence for the contribution of gut microbiota in the disruption of intestinal immune homeostasis and immunoregulatory mechanisms that are associated with the resolution of inflammation through FMT in IBD.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.comz795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: QW Microbiology. Immunology
WI Digestive system. Gastroenterology
Divisions: Planned IP Care > Gastroentrology
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Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 12 Dec 2019 12:54
Last Modified: 12 Dec 2019 12:54
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2677

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