Hyperprolactinaemia.

Samperi, Irene and Lithgow, Kirstie and Karavitaki, Niki (2019) Hyperprolactinaemia. Journal of clinical medicine, 8 (12). ISSN 2077-0383. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Official URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2077-0383/8/12/2203

Abstract

Hyperprolactinaemia is one of the most common problems in clinical endocrinology. It relates with various aetiologies (physiological, pharmacological, pathological), the clarification of which requires careful history taking and clinical assessment. Analytical issues (presence of macroprolactin or of the hook effect) need to be taken into account when interpreting the prolactin values. Medications and sellar/parasellar masses (prolactin secreting or acting through "stalk effect") are the most common causes of pathological hyperprolactinaemia. Hypogonadism and galactorrhoea are well-recognized manifestations of prolactin excess, although its implications on bone health, metabolism and immune system are also expanding. Treatment mainly aims at restoration and maintenance of normal gonadal function/fertility, and prevention of osteoporosis; further specific management strategies depend on the underlying cause. In this review, we provide an update on the diagnostic and management approaches for the patient with hyperprolactinaemia and on the current data looking at the impact of high prolactin on metabolism, cardiovascular and immune systems.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WK Endocrine system. Endocrinology
Divisions: Planned IP Care
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Depositing User: Mrs Yolande Brookes
Date Deposited: 20 Dec 2019 14:46
Last Modified: 20 Dec 2019 14:46
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2705

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