Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D fluctuations in military personnel during 6-month summer operational deployments in Afghanistan.

Fallowfield, Joanne L and Delves, Simon K and Hill, Neil E and Lanham-New, Susan A and Shaw, Anneliese M and Brown, Pieter E H and Bentley, Conor and Wilson, Duncan R and Allsopp, Adrian J (2019) Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D fluctuations in military personnel during 6-month summer operational deployments in Afghanistan. The British journal of nutrition, 121 (4). pp. 384-392. ISSN 1475-2662. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Abstract

Soldier operational performance is determined by their fitness, nutritional status, quality of rest/recovery, and remaining injury/illness free. Understanding large fluctuations in nutritional status during operations is critical to safeguarding health and well-being. There are limited data world-wide describing the effect of extreme climate change on nutrient profiles. This study investigated the effect of hot-dry deployments on vitamin D status (assessed from 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration) of young, male, military volunteers. Two data sets are presented (pilot study, n 37; main study, n 98), examining serum 25(OH)D concentrations before and during 6-month summer operational deployments to Afghanistan (March to October/November). Body mass, percentage of body fat, dietary intake and serum 25(OH)D concentrations were measured. In addition, parathyroid hormone (PTH), adjusted Ca and albumin concentrations were measured in the main study to better understand 25(OH)D fluctuations. Body mass and fat mass (FM) losses were greater for early (pre- to mid-) deployment compared with late (mid- to post-) deployment (P<0·05). Dietary intake was well-maintained despite high rates of energy expenditure. A pronounced increase in 25(OH)D was observed between pre- (March) and mid-deployment (June) (pilot study: 51 (sd 20) v. 212 (sd 85) nmol/l, P<0·05; main study: 55 (sd 22) v. 167 (sd 71) nmol/l, P<0·05) and remained elevated post-deployment (October/November). In contrast, PTH was highest pre-deployment, decreasing thereafter (main study: 4·45 (sd 2·20) v. 3·79 (sd 1·50) pmol/l, P<0·05). The typical seasonal cycling of vitamin D appeared exaggerated in this active male population undertaking an arduous summer deployment. Further research is warranted, where such large seasonal vitamin D fluctuations may be detrimental to bone health in the longer-term.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WD Diseases and disorders of systemic, metabolic or environmental origin > WD10 Diet and nutrition
Divisions: Emergency Services > Therapies
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jennifer Manders
Date Deposited: 02 Jan 2020 14:10
Last Modified: 02 Jan 2020 14:10
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2728

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