In vitro endothelial hyperpermeability occurs early following traumatic hemorrhagic shock.

van Leeuwen, Anoek L I and Naumann, David N and Dekker, Nicole A M and Hordijk, Peter L and Hutchings, Sam D and Boer, Christa and van den Brom, Charissa E (2020) In vitro endothelial hyperpermeability occurs early following traumatic hemorrhagic shock. Clinical hemorheology and microcirculation. ISSN 1875-8622. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

Endothelial hyperpermeability is suggested to play a role in the development of microcirculatory perfusion disturbances and organ failure following hemorrhagic shock, but evidence is limited.

OBJECTIVE

To study the effect of plasma from traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients on in vitro endothelial barrier function.

METHODS

Plasma from traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients was obtained at the emergency department (ED), the intensive care unit (ICU), 24 h after ICU admission and from controls (n = 8). Sublingual microcirculatory perfusion was measured using incident dark field videomicroscopy at matching time points. Using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing, the effects of plasma exposure on in vitro endothelial barrier function of human endothelial cells were assessed.

RESULTS

Plasma from traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients collected at ED admission induced a 19% loss of in vitro endothelial resistance compared to plasma from controls (p < 0.001). This loss was due to reduced cell-cell contacts (p < 0.01). Plasma withdrawn at later time points did not affect endothelial barrier function (p > 0.99). Interestingly, in vitro endothelial resistance showed a positive association with in vivo microcirculatory perfusion (r = 0.56, p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Plasma from traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients obtained following ED admission, but not at later stages, induced in vitro endothelial hyperpermeability. This coincided with in vivo microcirculatory perfusion disturbances.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WG Cardiovascular system. Cardiology
Divisions: Planned IP Care > Vascular
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Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 17 Jan 2020 14:15
Last Modified: 17 Jan 2020 14:15
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2765

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