A survey of key opinion leaders on ethical resuscitation practices in 31 European Countries.

Mentzelopoulos, Spyros D, Bossaert, Leo, Raffay, Violetta, Askitopoulou, Helen, Perkins, Gavin D, Greif, Robert, Haywood, Kirstie, Van de Voorde, Patrick and Xanthos, Theodoros (2016) A survey of key opinion leaders on ethical resuscitation practices in 31 European Countries. Resuscitation, 100. pp. 11-7. ISSN 1873-1570. This article is available to all HEFT staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their HEFT Athens login IDs

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Official URL: http://www.resuscitationjournal.com/article/S0300-...

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Europe is a patchwork of 47 countries with legal, cultural, religious, and economic differences. A prior study suggested variation in ethical resuscitation/end-of-life practices across Europe. This study aimed to determine whether this variation has evolved, and whether the application of ethical practices is associated with emergency care organisation.

METHODS

A questionnaire covering four domains of resuscitation ethics was developed based on consensus: (A) Approaches to end-of-life care and family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation; (B) Determinants of access to best resuscitation and post-resuscitation care; (C) Diagnosis of death and organ donation (D) Emergency care organisation. The questionnaire was sent to representatives of 32 countries. Responses to 4-choice or 2-choice questions pertained to local legislation and common practice. Positive responses were graded by 1 and negative responses by 0; grades were reconfirmed/corrected by respondents from 31/32 countries (97%). For each resuscitation/end-of-life practice a subcomponent score was calculated by grades' summation. Subcomponent scores' summation resulted in domain total scores.

RESULTS

Data from 31 countries were analysed. Domains A, B, and D total scores exhibited substantial variation (respective total score ranges, 1-41, 0-19 and 9-32), suggesting variable interpretation and application of bioethical principles, and particularly of autonomy. Linear regression revealed a significant association between domain A and D total scores (adjusted r(2)=0.42, P<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

According to key experts, ethical practices and emergency care still vary across Europe. There is need for harmonised legislation, and improved, education-based interpretation/application of bioethical principles. Better application of ethical practices may be associated with improved emergency care organisation.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all HEFT staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their HEFT Athens login IDs
Subjects: WB Practice of medicine > WB400 Intensive care
WD Diseases and disorders of systemic, metabolic or environmental origin > WD400 Emergency medicine
Divisions: Clinical Support > Critical Care
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Mrs Caroline Tranter
Date Deposited: 30 Mar 2017 13:36
Last Modified: 30 Mar 2017 13:36
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/1327

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