Adult minimal-change disease: observational data from a UK centre on patient characteristics, therapies, and outcomes.

Fenton, Anthony, Smith, Stuart W and Hewins, Peter (2018) Adult minimal-change disease: observational data from a UK centre on patient characteristics, therapies, and outcomes. BMC nephrology, 19 (1). p. 207. ISSN 1471-2369.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

Minimal change disease (MCD) is a common cause of the nephrotic syndrome in adults with limited evidence on its treatment and prognosis. We examined the presenting characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of adult patients with MCD in our centre.

METHODS

This was an observational cohort study using retrospectively-collected data. All patients who had a renal biopsy reported as MCD between 1996 and 2012 were included, and data were collected at baseline and during follow-up. Statistical analysis included Cox-regression analysis to examine which factors were associated with risk of relapse.

RESULTS

Seventy-eight patients were included, and had a median age of 36 years, and were 60% male and 73% white. Median follow-up time was 72 months. 37% were in AKI at presentation, which was significantly associated with a lower serum albumin and older age. Although 10% were steroid-resistant, 98% achieved remission at a median time of 5 weeks. 61% relapsed, at a median time of 11 months, and patients had a median number of 2 relapses during follow-up. A higher eGFR was associated with an increased risk of relapse (hazard ratio 1.18 [1.03-1.36] per 10 mL/min increase in eGFR), and females were significantly more likely than males to have an early relapse. Nearly half of the cohort required an additional immunosuppressive agent on top of glucocorticoids, the most commonly used being calcineurin inhibitors. Five patients subsequently developed FSGS: these patients had a lower baseline creatinine, a higher serum albumin, a longer time to remission, and were more likely to be steroid-resistant. Follow-up renal function was generally preserved, but follow-up creatinine was higher in those who had presented with AKI, and in those who had been commenced on a RAS inhibitor after biopsy. Infection requiring admission, diabetes mellitus and venous thromboembolism developed in 14%, 12%, and 12% of patients respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Nearly all adults with MCD achieve remission, but relapses and disease- and therapy-related complications are common. In our cohort, eGFR and gender were associated with risk of relapse, and these previously undescribed associations could be explored further in future work.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Emergency Services > Renal
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jennifer Manders
Date Deposited: 09 Aug 2019 09:19
Last Modified: 18 Feb 2021 12:31
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2288

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