Contact tracing strategies in household and congregate environments to identify cases of tuberculosis in low- and moderate-incidence populations.

Braganza Menezes, Darryl, Menezes, Bunota and Dedicoat, Martin (2019) Contact tracing strategies in household and congregate environments to identify cases of tuberculosis in low- and moderate-incidence populations. The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, 8. CD013077. ISSN 1469-493X. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

Tuberculosis is an infectious bacterial disease that is spread via respiratory droplets from infected individuals to susceptible contacts. To eliminate this disease from low- and medium-incidence settings, people who are most likely to be infected (contacts) must be identified. Recently, study authors have examined alternate approaches to contact tracing methods that demonstrate improved detection and prioritization of contacts. The comparative benefit of these methods has not been established.

OBJECTIVES

To assess the effectiveness of novel methods of contact tracing versus current standard of care to identify latent and active cases in low- to moderate-incidence settings.

SEARCH METHODS

We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, Web of Science, and CINAHL up to 15 July 2019. We also searched for clinical trials and examined reference lists and conference proceedings.

SELECTION CRITERIA

Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs of contact tracing strategies that included alternate approaches (other than standard practice).

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS

Two review authors independently assessed identified articles for eligibility and quality using prespecified criteria.

MAIN RESULTS

No trials met the inclusion criteria of this review. Several study authors described an alternate method for examining contacts and performing social network analysis but did not compare this with the current contact tracing approach.

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS

This Cochrane Review highlights the lack of research in support of the current contact tracing method and the need for RCTs to compare new methods such as social network analysis to improve contact tracing processes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WF Respiratory system. Respiratory medicine
Divisions: Clinical Support > Infectious Diseases
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Depositing User: Mrs Yolande Brookes
Date Deposited: 30 Aug 2019 13:56
Last Modified: 30 Aug 2019 13:56
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2343

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