Does non-operative management of iatrogenic bile duct injury result in impaired quality of life? A systematic review.

Halle-Smith, James M, Hodson, James, Stevens, Lewis, Mirza, Darius F and Roberts, Keith J (2019) Does non-operative management of iatrogenic bile duct injury result in impaired quality of life? A systematic review. The surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland, S1479- (19). pp. 30093-9. ISSN 1479-666X. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several studies have reported the effect of bile duct injury (BDI) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) with conflicting results. This systematic review aims to study the impact of patient and treatment factors on HRQOL after BDI.

METHODS

A search of the PubMed database was performed and studies were reviewed as per the PRISMA guidelines. Selected studies (n = 11) were then divided into two subgroups depending on whether they found HRQOL to be similar or worse between BDI and control groups. Pooled rates of surgical repair and major BDI were calculated for each of these subgroups.

RESULTS

Surgical repair rates were 99% (95% CI: 96%-99%) in studies where the BDI patients had similar outcomes to controls, compared to 78% (40%-100%) where their outcomes were significantly worse (p = 0.091). The major BDI rate was 51% (95% CI: 42%-61%) in studies where the BDI patients had similar outcomes to controls, compared to 72% (41%-94%) where their outcomes were significantly worse (p = 0.322). Considerable heterogeneity was present within the two subgroups (I: 68-99%).

DISCUSSION

HRQOL may be adversely affected amongst patients with BDI who do not undergo surgical repair. Significant heterogeneity of data suggests the need for standardised HRQOL tools and injury severity systems when assessing outcomes after BDI.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WI Digestive system. Gastroenterology
WO Surgery
Divisions: Planned IP Care > Gastroentrology
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 25 Sep 2019 09:14
Last Modified: 02 Oct 2019 15:23
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2408

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