Cabins, castles, and constant hearts: rhythm control therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation.

Willems, Stephan, Meyer, Christian, de Bono, Joseph, Brandes, Axel, Eckardt, Lars, Elvan, Arif, van Gelder, Isabelle, Goette, Andreas, Gulizia, Michele, Haegeli, Laurent, Heidbuchel, Hein, Haeusler, Karl Georg, Kautzner, Josef, Mont, Lluis, Ng, G Andre, Szumowski, Lukasz, Themistoclakis, Sakis, Wegscheider, Karl and Kirchhof, Paulus (2019) Cabins, castles, and constant hearts: rhythm control therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation. European heart journal. ISSN 1522-9645.

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Official URL: https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/advance-article...

Abstract

Recent innovations have the potential to improve rhythm control therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Controlled trials provide new evidence on the effectiveness and safety of rhythm control therapy, particularly in patients with AF and heart failure. This review summarizes evidence supporting the use of rhythm control therapy in patients with AF for different outcomes, discusses implications for indications, and highlights remaining clinical gaps in evidence. Rhythm control therapy improves symptoms and quality of life in patients with symptomatic AF and can be safely delivered in elderly patients with comorbidities (mean age 70 years, 3-7% complications at 1 year). Atrial fibrillation ablation maintains sinus rhythm more effectively than antiarrhythmic drug therapy, but recurrent AF remains common, highlighting the need for better patient selection (precision medicine). Antiarrhythmic drugs remain effective after AF ablation, underpinning the synergistic mechanisms of action of AF ablation and antiarrhythmic drugs. Atrial fibrillation ablation appears to improve left ventricular function in a subset of patients with AF and heart failure. Data on the prognostic effect of rhythm control therapy are heterogeneous without a clear signal for either benefit or harm. Rhythm control therapy has acceptable safety and improves quality of life in patients with symptomatic AF, including in elderly populations with stroke risk factors. There is a clinical need to better stratify patients for rhythm control therapy. Further studies are needed to determine whether rhythm control therapy, and particularly AF ablation, improves left ventricular function and reduces AF-related complications.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WG Cardiovascular system. Cardiology
Divisions: Emergency Services > Cardiology
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 29 Nov 2019 12:24
Last Modified: 03 Dec 2019 10:25
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/2640

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