Sicker patients account for the weekend mortality effect among adult emergency admissions to a large hospital trust.

Sun, Jianxia, Girling, Alan J, Aldridge, Cassie, Evison, Felicity, Beet, Chris, Boyal, Amunpreet, Rudge, Gavin, Lilford, Richard J and Bion, Julian (2019) Sicker patients account for the weekend mortality effect among adult emergency admissions to a large hospital trust. BMJ quality & safety, 28 (3). pp. 223-230. ISSN 2044-5423. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs.

Full text not available from this repository.
Official URL: https://qualitysafety.bmj.com/content/28/3/223.lon...

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether the higher weekend admission mortality risk is attributable to increased severity of illness.

DESIGN

Retrospective analysis of 4 years weekend and weekday adult emergency admissions to a university teaching hospital in England.

OUTCOME MEASURES

30-day postadmission weekend:weekday mortality ratios adjusted for severity of illness (baseline National Early Warning Score (NEWS)), routes of admission to hospital, transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) and demographics.

RESULTS

Despite similar emergency department daily attendance rates, fewer patients were admitted on weekends (mean admission rate 91/day vs 120/day) because of fewer general practitioner referrals. Weekend admissions were sicker than weekday (mean NEWS 1.8 vs 1.7, p=0.008), more likely to undergo transfer to ICU within 24 hours (4.2% vs 3.0%), spent longer in hospital (median 3 days vs 2 days) and less likely to experience same-day discharge (17.2% vs 21.9%) (all p values <0.001).The crude 30-day postadmission mortality ratio for weekend admission (OR=1.13; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.19) was attenuated using standard adjustment (OR=1.11; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.17). In patients for whom NEWS values were available (90%), the crude OR (1.07; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.13) was not affected with standard adjustment. Adjustment using NEWS alone nullified the weekend effect (OR=1.02; 0.96-1.08).NEWS completion rates were higher on weekends (91.7%) than weekdays (89.5%). Missing NEWS was associated with direct transfer to intensive care bypassing electronic data capture. Missing NEWS in non-ICU weekend patients was associated with a higher mortality and fewer same-day discharges than weekdays.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients admitted to hospital on weekends are sicker than those admitted on weekdays. The cause of the weekend effect may lie in community services.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs.
Subjects: W Public health. Health statistics. Occupational health. Health education
WA Patients. Primary care. Medical profession. Forensic medicine
WD Diseases and disorders of systemic, metabolic or environmental origin > WD400 Emergency medicine
Divisions: Clinical Support
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Mrs Noomi Tyholdt-Pidgley
Date Deposited: 06 May 2020 14:34
Last Modified: 06 May 2020 14:34
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/3050

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item