Does declared surgeon specialist interest influence the outcome of emergency laparotomy?

Hallam, S, Bickley, M, Phelan, L, Dilworth, M and Bowley, D M (2020) Does declared surgeon specialist interest influence the outcome of emergency laparotomy? Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. pp. 1-5. ISSN 1478-7083. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Official URL: https://publishing.rcseng.ac.uk/doi/abs/10.1308/rc...

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

In the UK, general surgeons must demonstrate competency in emergency general surgery before obtaining a certificate of completion of training. Subsequently, many consultants develop focused elective specialist interests which may not mirror the breadth of procedures encountered during emergency practice. Recent National Emergency Laparotomy Audit analysis found that declared surgeon special interest impacted emergency laparotomy outcomes, which has implications for emergency general surgery service configuration. We sought to establish whether local declared surgeon special interest impacts emergency laparotomy outcomes.

METHODS

Adult patients having emergency laparotomy were identified from our prospective National Emergency Laparotomy Audit database from May 2016 to May 2019 and categorised as colorectal or oesophagogastric according to operative procedure. Outcomes included 30-day mortality, return to theatre and length of stay. Binomial logistic regression was used to identify any association between declared consultant specialist interest and outcomes.

RESULTS

Of 600 laparotomies, 358 (58.6%) were classifiable as specialist procedures: 287 (80%) colorectal and 71 (20%) oesophagogastric. Discordance between declared specialty and operation undertaken occurred in 25% of procedures. For colorectal emergency laparotomy, there was an increased risk of 30-day mortality when performed by a non-colorectal consultant (unadjusted odds ratio 2.34; 95% confidence interval 1.10-5.00; = 0.003); however, when adjusted for confounders within multivariate analysis declared surgeon specialty had no impact on mortality, return to theatre or length of stay.

CONCLUSION

Surgeon-declared specialty does not impact emergency laparotomy outcomes in this cohort of undifferentiated emergency laparotomies. This may reflect the on-call structure at Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, where a colorectal and oesophagogastric consultant are paired on call and provide cross-cover when needed.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WB Practice of medicine
WO Surgery
Divisions: Planned IP Care > General Surgery
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Mrs Yolande Brookes
Date Deposited: 14 May 2020 15:45
Last Modified: 14 May 2020 15:45
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/3073

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