The benefits of latex-free gloves in the operating room environment.

Henry, Nader, Icot, Romelyn and Jeffery, Steve (2020) The benefits of latex-free gloves in the operating room environment. British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing), 29 (10). pp. 570-576. ISSN 0966-0461. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Official URL: https://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/full/10.12968...

Abstract

Sterile protective gloves are used to reduce the risk of infection for patients and clinicians in all healthcare settings. This is particularly important in operating theatres, where surgical site infection is a common and serious complication for perioperative patients. These gloves have traditionally been made from natural rubber latex and dusted with cornstarch powder. However, frequent use of latex gloves can lead to a hypersensitivity or allergy to latex. A latex allergy causes discomfort and inconvenience, and it may reduce productivity, impose significant financial burdens and even be life threatening. There has not been sufficient evidence to ban the clinical use of latex; however, in cases of suspected latex allergy, guidelines recommend the use of either latex-free gloves or powder-free, low-protein latex gloves. The use of these alternative gloves has typically been limited to cases of allergy, because they have previously been associated with reduced dexterity and durability compared with latex gloves. This article presents four case studies, in which health professionals in a perioperative setting compare the advantages and disadvantages of using traditional latex surgical gloves with those of latex-free gloves manufactured by Cardinal Health. The findings of these case studies suggest that these latex-free gloves are equal to latex gloves in terms of establishing asepsis and providing comfort and dexterity to the wearer, without presenting the risk of developing latex sensitivity and/or allergy.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WD Diseases and disorders of systemic, metabolic or environmental origin > WD300 Hypersensitivity. Allergy
WY Nursing
Divisions: Planned IP Care > Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
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Depositing User: Mrs Yolande Brookes
Date Deposited: 04 Jun 2020 13:10
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2020 13:10
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/3137

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