Pediatric Allergic Diseases in the Indian Subcontinent -Epidemiology, Risk Factors and Current Challenges.

Krishna, Mamidipudi Thirumala, Mahesh, Padukudru Anand, Vedanthan, Pudupakkam K, Mehta, Vinay, Moitra, Saibal and Christopher, Devasahayam Jesudas (2020) Pediatric Allergic Diseases in the Indian Subcontinent -Epidemiology, Risk Factors and Current Challenges. Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology. ISSN 1399-3038. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Official URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/pa...

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

India is low middle-income country (LMIC) with a population of 1.3bn, comprising about 20% of the global population. Whilst the high-income western countries faced an 'allergy epidemic' during the last three decades, there has been a gradual rise in prevalence of allergic diseases in India.

METHODS

Narrative review RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Allergic diseases occur as a consequence of a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. There are multiple contrasting determinants that are important to consider in India including high levels of air pollution, in particular PM due to burning of fossil fuels and biomass fuels, diverse aero-biology, tropical climate, cultural and social diversity, religious beliefs/myths, linguistic diversity, literacy level, breastfeeding and weaning, diet (large proportion vegetarian), high incidence rates of TB, HIV, malaria, filariasis, parasitic infestations and others, that not only shape the immune system early in life, but also impact on biomarkers relevant to allergic diseases. India has a relatively weak and heterogeneous healthcare framework and allergology has not yet been recognized as an independent speciality. There are very few postgraduate training programmes and allergic diseases are managed by primary care physicians, organ-based specialists and general pediatricians. Adrenaline auto-injectors are not available, there is patient unaffordability for inhalers, nasal sprays and biologics and this is compounded by poor compliance leading to 40-50% of asthmatic children having uncontrolled disease and high rates of oral corticosteroid use. Standardised allergen extracts are not available for skin tests and desensitization.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WD Diseases and disorders of systemic, metabolic or environmental origin > WD300 Hypersensitivity. Allergy
WS Paediatrics. Child health
Divisions: Clinical Support > Immunology
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Depositing User: Mrs Yolande Brookes
Date Deposited: 19 Jun 2020 15:38
Last Modified: 19 Jun 2020 15:38
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/3192

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