Diabetic myonecrosis: an uncommon diabetic complication.

Kempegowda, Punith, Melson, Eka, Langman, Gerald, Khattar, Fady, Karamat, Muhammad A and Altaf, Quratul-Ain Altaf (2019) Diabetic myonecrosis: an uncommon diabetic complication. Endocrinology, diabetes & metabolism case reports, 2019 (1). pp. 1-4. ISSN 2052-0573. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

Full text not available from this repository.
Official URL: https://edm.bioscientifica.com/

Abstract

Summary

Diabetic myonecrosis, also known as diabetic muscle infarction is a rare complication of diabetes mellitus usually associated with longstanding suboptimal glycaemic control. Although theories of atherosclerosis, diabetic microangiopathy, vasculitis, ischaemia-reperfusion injury and hypercoagulable state have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology, none of these have been able to individually explain the pathophysiology in entirety. Diabetic renal disease is the most common risk factor for developing DMN and its recurrence. The diagnosis is often missed due to lack of awareness and the presentation mimicking other conditions associated with DM. The routine laboratory investigations are often non-specific and do not provide much value in the diagnosis as well. Muscle biopsy can provide a definite diagnosis but is not currently recommended due to its invasiveness and association with prolonged time to symptoms resolution. Magnetic resonance imaging, in combination with classic history and risk factors can clinch the diagnosis. Treatment is generally analgesia and rest, although the former's use may be limited in the presence of renal disease.

Learning Points

Diabetic myonecrosis is a rare complication of diabetes mellitus associated with longstanding suboptimal glycaemic control. Diabetic renal disease is a known risk factor, although the evidence is merely observational. Although muscle biopsy could provide a definite diagnosis, it is not recommended as it can prolong the disease process and should be reserved only for cases not responding to conventional treatment. Typical MRI findings in combination with classic symptoms and risk factors can clinch the diagnosis Current treatment recommendations include NSAIDs and/or aspirin (if not contraindicated) alongside bed rest. Physiotherapy is not recommended in the acute phase but should be started as soon as patient is discharged from hospital. Optimal glycaemic control is key to prevent recurrence.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: QU Biochemistry
WK Endocrine system. Endocrinology
Divisions: Ambulatory Care > Endocrinology
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 29 Jul 2020 09:13
Last Modified: 29 Jul 2020 09:13
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/3319

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item