The Associations of Muscle Strength, Muscle Mass, and Adiposity With Clinical Outcomes and Quality of Life in Prevalent Kidney Transplant Recipients.

Chan, Winnie, Chin, Shui Hao, Whittaker, Anna C, Jones, David, Kaur, Okdeep, Bosch, Jos A and Borrows, Richard (2019) The Associations of Muscle Strength, Muscle Mass, and Adiposity With Clinical Outcomes and Quality of Life in Prevalent Kidney Transplant Recipients. Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation, 29 (6). pp. 536-547. ISSN 1532-8503. Available through UHB Open Athens

Full text not available from this repository.
Official URL: https://www.jrnjournal.org/article/S1051-2276(19)3...

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Sarcopenia, defined as loss of both muscle strength and mass, is associated with inferior clinical outcomes and quality of life (QoL) in chronic kidney disease, but its effects are unknown in kidney transplantation. Obesity confers increased mortality risk and compromises QoL in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs), but the impacts of sarcopenic obesity remain unexplored. This study aimed to evaluate the associations of muscle strength and mass, sarcopenia, and sarcopenic obesity with clinical outcomes and QoL in KTRs.

METHODS

This prospective longitudinal study enrolled 128 KTRs ≥1-year posttransplantation. Low muscle strength (by handgrip strength) and mass (by bioimpedance analysis), and a combination of both (sarcopenia) were defined as < reference cutoffs for corresponding indices. Sarcopenic obesity was defined as sarcopenia combined with fulfillment of ≥2 out of 3 criteria from (1) body mass index ≥30 kg/m, (2) bioimpedance analysis-derived fat mass > reference cutoffs, and (3) waist circumference > World Health Organization cutoffs. Prospective follow-up data on mortality and hospitalization were collected. QoL was evaluated using Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 questionnaire.

RESULTS

Median follow-up duration was 64 (60-72) months. Low muscle strength was independently associated with the composite endpoint of mortality and hospitalization (hazard ratio = 2.45; P = .006), and QoL (physical-related: β = -12.2; P = .04; mental-related: β = -9.9; P = .04). Low muscle mass (β = -8.8; P = .04) and sarcopenia (β = -14.7; P = .03) were associated with physical-related QoL only. No independent associations were found between muscle mass, sarcopenia, and sarcopenic obesity with the composite outcome of mortality and hospitalization.

CONCLUSION

Low muscle strength is common among KTRs, conferring poor prognosis in the medium term. Future research on strength training may prove valuable in improving kidney transplantation outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Available through UHB Open Athens
Subjects: WJ Urogenital system. Urology
Divisions: Emergency Services > Renal
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Beth Connors
Date Deposited: 24 Aug 2020 12:36
Last Modified: 24 Aug 2020 12:36
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/3378

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item