Improving abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening uptake through patient engagement-analysis and outcomes of strategies to improve uptake at a regional programme level.

Ahmad, Mehtab, Reading, Kimberley and Gannon, Mark X (2020) Improving abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening uptake through patient engagement-analysis and outcomes of strategies to improve uptake at a regional programme level. Annals of vascular surgery. ISSN 1615-5947. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To identify areas of health inequality that adversely affect patient engagement at a regional level within the National Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening Programme (NAAASP). Patient-reported improvements to services were implemented and analysis of subsequent uptake undertaken.

METHODS

Prospective study of 390 men who failed to attend their AAA screening invitation. Non-attendees were contacted by post and telephone. Patients were analysed according to ethnicity, working status and Index of Multiple Deprivation quintile. Patient suggested improvements to the service were recorded, analysed and implemented. Uptake data was then collected for the subsequent two years.

RESULTS

The SMaRT system used by NAAASP is 97% accurate in holding patient contact details and non-attenders are four times more likely to respond to telephone contact. Reasons for failing to attend screening invitations include factors that can be addressed at a regional level such as: inconvenient timings/locations of screening clinics and a lack of awareness or understanding of what AAA screening means as well as language/literacy barriers. The incidence of AAA in the non-attendee group was almost 3 times that of our general (attending) population. Afro-Caribbean men were disproportionately less likely to attend for screening. After implementing patient-suggested improvements to the service, screening uptake increased from 75.2% (2015-16 screening year) to 81.3% (2017-18).

CONCLUSIONS

To date, no other studies have gone on to assess the effectiveness of interventions targeted at reducing inequalities in NAAASP attendance but we show an increase in local screening uptake of 6% in a 2-year period after implementing improvement strategies. This paper adds to existing literature by confirming external factors such as social deprivation adversely influence screening uptake and that AAA are more prevalent in socially deprived groups. It reinforces the importance of regional attempts to contact and engage non-attenders as they may be most at risk of developing AAA.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WA Patients. Primary care. Medical profession. Forensic medicine
WG Cardiovascular system. Cardiology
Divisions: Emergency Services > Cardiology
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Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 29 Sep 2020 10:08
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2020 10:08
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/3482

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