Penetrating Neck Injuries Treated at a U.S. Role 3 Medical Treatment Facility in Afghanistan During Operation Resolute Support.

Breeze, John, Gensheimer, William G and DuBose, Joseph J (2020) Penetrating Neck Injuries Treated at a U.S. Role 3 Medical Treatment Facility in Afghanistan During Operation Resolute Support. Military medicine. ISSN 1930-613X.

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Military trauma registries can identify broad epidemiological trends from neck wounds but cannot reliably demonstrate temporal casualty from clinical interventions or differentiate penetrating neck injuries (PNI) from those that do not breach platysma.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

All casualties presenting with a neck wound to a Role 3 Medical Treatment Facility in Afghanistan between January 1, 2016 and September 15, 2019 were retrospectively identified using the Emergency Room database. These were matched to records from the Operating Room database, and computed tomography (CT) scans reviewed to determine damage to the neck region.

RESULTS

During this period, 78 casualties presented to the Emergency Room with a neck wound. Forty-one casualties underwent surgery for a neck wound, all of whom had a CT scan. Of these, 35/41 (85%) were deep to platysma (PNI). Casualties with PNI underwent neck exploration in 71% of casualties (25/35), with 8/25 (32%) having surgical exploration at Role 2 where CT is not present. Exploration was more likely in Zones 1 and 2 (8/10, 80% and 18/22, 82%, respectively) compared to Zone 3 (2/8, 25%).

CONCLUSION

Hemodynamically unstable patients in Zones 1 and 2 generally underwent surgery before CT, confirming that the low threshold for exploration in such patients remains. Only 25% (2/8) of Zone 3 PNI were explored, with the high negative predictive value of CT angiography providing confidence that it was capable of excluding major injury in the majority of cases. No deaths from PNI that survived to treatment at Role 3 were identified, lending evidence to the current management protocols being utilized in Afghanistan.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WO Surgery
Divisions: Planned IP Care > Trauma and Orthopaedics
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Depositing User: Mr Philip O'Reilly
Date Deposited: 13 Oct 2020 13:07
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2020 13:07
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/3545

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