Pathological features of 11,337 patients with primary ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and subsequent events: results from the UK Sloane Project.

Shaaban, Abeer M, Hilton, Bridget, Clements, Karen, Provenzano, Elena, Cheung, Shan, Wallis, Matthew G, Sawyer, Elinor, Thomas, Jeremy S, Hanby, Andrew M, Pinder, Sarah E and Thompson, Alastair M (2020) Pathological features of 11,337 patients with primary ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and subsequent events: results from the UK Sloane Project. British journal of cancer. ISSN 1532-1827. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Official URL: http://www.nature.com/bjc/

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The Sloane audit compares screen-detected ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) pathology with subsequent management and outcomes.

METHODS

This was a national, prospective cohort study of DCIS diagnosed during 2003-2012.

RESULTS

Among 11,337 patients, 7204 (64%) had high-grade DCIS. Over time, the proportion of high-grade disease increased (from 60 to 65%), low-grade DCIS decreased (from 10 to 6%) and mean size increased (from 21.4 to 24.1 mm). Mastectomy was more common for high-grade (36%) than for low-grade DCIS (15%). Few (6%) patients treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) had a surgical margin <1 mm. Of the 9191 women diagnosed in England (median follow-up 9.4 years), 7% developed DCIS or invasive malignancy in the ipsilateral and 5% in the contralateral breast. The commonest ipsilateral event was invasive carcinoma (n = 413), median time 62 months, followed by DCIS (n = 225), at median 37 months. Radiotherapy (RT) was most protective against recurrence for high-grade DCIS (3.2% for high-grade DCIS with RT compared to 6.9% without, compared with 2.3 and 3.0%, respectively, for low/intermediate-grade DCIS). Ipsilateral DCIS events lessened after 5 years, while the risk of ipsilateral invasive cancer remained consistent to beyond 10 years.

CONCLUSION

DCIS pathology informs patient management and highlights the need for prolonged follow-up of screen-detected DCIS.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: QV Pharmacology
QZ Pathology. Oncology
W Public health. Health statistics. Occupational health. Health education
Divisions: Planned IP Care > Oncology and Clinical Haematology
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 23 Nov 2020 15:55
Last Modified: 23 Nov 2020 15:55
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/3711

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