Optimizing Organ Donation: Expert Opinion from Austria, Germany, Spain and the U.K.

Becker, Fabian, Roberts, Keith J, Nadal, Miriam de, Zink, Michael, Stiegler, Philipp, Pemberger, Sonja, Castellana, Teresa Pont, Kellner, Christian, Murphy, Nick, Kaltenborn, Alexander, Tuffs, Annette, Amelung, Volker, Krauth, Christian, Bayliss, Janice and Schrem, Harald H (2020) Optimizing Organ Donation: Expert Opinion from Austria, Germany, Spain and the U.K. Annals of transplantation, 25. e921727. ISSN 2329-0358. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Abstract

BACKGROUND Organ donation-rates using deceased donors and organizational approaches to organ donation differ drastically between countries at a similar level of health care as measured by the Euro Health Consumer Index (EHCI). MATERIAL AND METHODS Expert opinions from intensive care nurses, physicians, transplant coordinators and transplant surgeons from Austria, Germany, Spain, and the U.K. were obtained in semi-structured interviews followed by qualitative content analysis. Results were reported back to all interview partners to identify potential controversies and consensus recommendations. RESULTS No controversies could be detected. On a variety of beneficial factors an interprofessional consensus between interview partners could be reached: A) The relevance of standardization of the screening for potential donors, the family approach and training; B) standards and best-practice procedures should be regulated and supervised by state authorities; C) full transparency and the prevention of scandals is essential; D) overburdened intensive care unit (ICU) doctors need to be supported by full-time in-house special nurses who organize donor evaluation, transport logistics and pastoral care, if required; E) public awareness campaigns are helpful; F) a broad public consensus on the concept of donation after brain and cardiac death is essential; G) incentives for the reporting of potential organ donors are inappropriate; H) an opt-out system alone is not sufficient. CONCLUSIONS Expert opinions from different professional backgrounds from different European health care systems reach a broad consensus on the most relevant issues for the improvement of organ donation.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WO Surgery
WO Surgery > WO500 Anaesthesia
Divisions: Clinical Support > Critical Care
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 05 Jan 2021 14:50
Last Modified: 05 Jan 2021 14:50
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/3800

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