Safety and efficacy of absorbable and non-absorbable fixation systems for intraperitoneal mesh fixation: an experimental study in swine.

Kapoulas, S, Papalois, A, Papadakis, G, Tsoulfas, G, Christoforidis, E, Papaziogas, B, Schizas, D and Chatzimavroudis, G (2021) Safety and efficacy of absorbable and non-absorbable fixation systems for intraperitoneal mesh fixation: an experimental study in swine. Hernia : the journal of hernias and abdominal wall surgery. ISSN 1248-9204. Available in full text via OpenAthens to UHB Athens account holders.

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Official URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10029-0...

Abstract

PURPOSE

Choice of the best possible fixation system in terms of safety and effectiveness for intraperitoneal mesh placement in hernia surgery remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of four fixation systems in a swine model of intraperitoneal mesh fixation.

METHODS

Fourteen Landrace swine were utilized in the study. The experiment included two stages. Initially, four pieces of mesh (Ventralight ™ ST) sizing 10 × 5 cm were placed and fixed intraperitoneally to reinforce 4 small full thickness abdominal wall defects created with diathermy. These defects were repaired primarily with absorbable suture before mesh implantation. Each mesh was anchored with a different tack device between Absorbatack™, Protack™, Capsure™, or Optifix™. The second stage took place after 60 days and included euthanasia, laparoscopy, and laparotomy via U-shaped incision to obtain the measurements for the outcome parameters. The primary endpoint of the study was to compare the peel strength of the compound tack/mesh from the abdominal wall. Secondary parameters were the extent and quality of visceral adhesions to the mesh, the degree of mesh shrinkage and the histological response around the tacks.

RESULTS

Thirteen out of 14 animals survived the experiment and 10 were included in the final analysis. Capsure™ tacks had higher peel strength when compared to Absorbatack™ (p = 0.028); Protack™ (p = 0.043); and Optifix™ (p = 0.009). No significant differences were noted regarding the extent of visceral adhesions (Friedman's test p value 0.854), the adhesion quality (Friedman's test p value 0.506), or the mesh shrinkage (Friedman's test p value = 0.827). Four out of the ten animals developed no adhesions at all 2 months after implantation.

CONCLUSION

Capsure™ fixation system provided higher peel strength that the other tested devices in our swine model of intraperitoneal mesh fixation. Our findings generate the hypothesis that this type of fixation may be superior in a clinical setting. Clinical trials with long-term follow-up are required to assess the safety and efficacy of mesh fixation systems in hernia surgery.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Available in full text via OpenAthens to UHB Athens account holders.
Subjects: WO Surgery
Divisions: Planned IP Care > General Surgery
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Mr Philip O'Reilly
Date Deposited: 14 Jan 2021 14:15
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2021 14:15
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/3843

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