A Position Statement on the Utility of Interval Imaging in Standard of Care Brain Tumour Management: Defining the Evidence Gap and Opportunities for Future Research.

Booth, Thomas C, Thompson, Gerard, Bulbeck, Helen, Boele, Florien, Buckley, Craig, Cardoso, Jorge, Dos Santos Canas, Liane, Jenkinson, David, Ashkan, Keyoumars, Kreindler, Jack, Huskens, Nicky, Luis, Aysha, McBain, Catherine, Mills, Samantha J, Modat, Marc, Morley, Nick, Murphy, Caroline, Ourselin, Sebastian, Pennington, Mark, Powell, James, Summers, David, Waldman, Adam D, Watts, Colin, Williams, Matthew, Grant, Robin and Jenkinson, Michael D (2021) A Position Statement on the Utility of Interval Imaging in Standard of Care Brain Tumour Management: Defining the Evidence Gap and Opportunities for Future Research. Frontiers in oncology, 11. p. 620070. ISSN 2234-943X.

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Official URL: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fonc....

Abstract

Objectiv e

To summarise current evidence for the utility of interval imaging in monitoring disease in adult brain tumours, and to develop a position for future evidence gathering while incorporating the application of data science and health economics.

Methods

Experts in 'interval imaging' (imaging at pre-planned time-points to assess tumour status); data science; health economics, trial management of adult brain tumours, and patient representatives convened in London, UK. The current evidence on the use of interval imaging for monitoring brain tumours was reviewed. To improve the evidence that interval imaging has a role in disease management, we discussed specific themes of data science, health economics, statistical considerations, patient and carer perspectives, and multi-centre study design. Suggestions for future studies aimed at filling knowledge gaps were discussed.

Results

Meningioma and glioma were identified as priorities for interval imaging utility analysis. The "monitoring biomarkers" most commonly used in adult brain tumour patients were standard structural MRI features. Interval imaging was commonly scheduled to provide reported imaging prior to planned, regular clinic visits. There is limited evidence relating interval imaging in the absence of clinical deterioration to management change that alters morbidity, mortality, quality of life, or resource use. Progression-free survival is confounded as an outcome measure when using structural MRI in glioma. Uncertainty from imaging causes distress for some patients and their caregivers, while for others it provides an important indicator of disease activity. Any study design that changes imaging regimens should consider the potential for influencing current or planned therapeutic trials, ensure that opportunity costs are measured, and capture indirect benefits and added value.

Conclusion

Evidence for the value, and therefore utility, of regular interval imaging is currently lacking. Ongoing collaborative efforts will improve trial design and generate the evidence to optimise monitoring imaging biomarkers in standard of care brain tumour management.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: WL Nervous system. Neurology
Divisions: Emergency Services > Neurology
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Mr Philip O'Reilly
Date Deposited: 10 Mar 2021 16:10
Last Modified: 10 Mar 2021 16:10
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/4077

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