The association of peak systolic velocity in the carotid artery with coronary heart disease: A study based on portable ultrasound.

König, Carola S, Atherton, Mark, Cavazzuti, Marco, Gomm, Corinna and Ramachandran, Sudarshan (2021) The association of peak systolic velocity in the carotid artery with coronary heart disease: A study based on portable ultrasound. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Part H, Journal of engineering in medicine. p. 9544119211000482. ISSN 2041-3033.

[img]
Preview
Text (PDF file format)
09544119211000482.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial 4.0.

Download (3MB) | Preview
Official URL: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/09544...

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the highest cause of death globally with more people dying annually from it than from any other cause. CVD is associated with modifiable risk factors (dyslipidaemia, hypertension and diabetes) and treating each of these factors lowers the risk of CVD. It is impossible to estimate the benefit of risk factor modification in the individual patient and extrapolating data from multiple trials is difficult. It would be useful to have a marker of risk that accurately estimates real time risk by measuring blood flow factors associated with the pathogenesis of atheroma. The aim of this preliminary study was to validate a low-cost measurement technique for obtaining blood flow velocity profiles and assess whether any of the measured and calculated factors, based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, known to be associated with atheroma was associated with coronary heart disease (CHD), thus establishing its feasibility and acceptability as a clinical tool and suggesting areas for future research. Our study identified (i) that mean peak systolic (PS) velocity being associated with CHD; individuals without CHD: mean (SD) = 62.8 (16.1) cm/s, with CHD: mean (SD)  = 53.6 (17.3) cm/s,  = 0.042; and (ii) that low-cost, portable ultrasound, which is routinely available in general practice, is a suitable assessment tool.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: QC-QM General sciences
QU Biochemistry
WG Cardiovascular system. Cardiology
Divisions: Emergency Services > Cardiology
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 25 Mar 2021 13:01
Last Modified: 25 Mar 2021 13:01
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/4121

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item