Association of Metformin with Susceptibility to COVID-19 in People with Type 2 Diabetes.

Wang, Jingya, Cooper, Jennifer M, Gokhale, Krishna, Acosta-Mena, Dionisio, Dhalla, Samir, Byne, Nathan, Chandan, Joht Singh, Anand, Astha, Okoth, Kelvin, Subramanian, Anuradhaa, Bangash, Mansoor N, Jackson, Thomas, Zemedikun, Dawit, Taverner, Tom, Hanif, Wasim, Ghosh, Sandip, Narendran, Parth, Toulis, Konstantinos A, Tahrani, Abd A, Surenthirakumaran, Rajendra, Adderley, Nicola J, Haroon, Shamil, Khunti, Kamlesh, Sainsbury, Christopher, Thomas, G Neil and Nirantharakumar, Krishnarajah (2021) Association of Metformin with Susceptibility to COVID-19 in People with Type 2 Diabetes. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 106 (5). pp. 1255-1268. ISSN 1945-7197. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

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Official URL: https://academic.oup.com/jcem

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Diabetes has emerged as an important risk factor for mortality from COVID-19. Metformin, the most commonly prescribed glucose-lowering agent, has been proposed to influence susceptibility to and outcomes of COVID-19 via multiple mechanisms. We investigated whether, in patients with diabetes, metformin is associated with susceptibility to COVID-19 and its outcomes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

We performed a propensity score-matched cohort study with active comparators using a large UK primary care dataset. Adults with type 2 diabetes patients and a current prescription for metformin and other glucose-lowering agents (MF+) were compared to those with a current prescription for glucose-lowering agents that did not include metformin (MF-). Outcomes were confirmed COVID-19, suspected/confirmed COVID-19, and associated mortality. A negative control outcome analysis (back pain) was also performed.

RESULTS

There were 29 558 and 10 271 patients in the MF+ and MF- groups, respectively, who met the inclusion criteria. In the propensity score-matched analysis, the adjusted hazard ratios for suspected/confirmed COVID-19, confirmed COVID-19, and COVID-19-related mortality were 0.85 (95% CI 0.67, 1.08), 0.80 (95% CI 0.49, 1.30), and 0.87 (95% CI 0.34, 2.20) respectively. The negative outcome control analysis did not suggest unobserved confounding.

CONCLUSION

Current prescription of metformin was not associated with the risk of COVID-19 or COVID-19-related mortality. It is safe to continue prescribing metformin to improve glycemic control in patients with.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: QW Microbiology. Immunology
WD Diseases and disorders of systemic, metabolic or environmental origin
WD Diseases and disorders of systemic, metabolic or environmental origin > WD250 Metabolic diseases
WK Endocrine system. Endocrinology
Divisions: Ambulatory Care > Endocrinology
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Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 30 Apr 2021 15:18
Last Modified: 30 Apr 2021 15:18
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/4271

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