What Do Diagnoses of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease in Specialist Sexual Health Services in England Tell Us About Chlamydia Control?

Davis, Grahame S, Horner, Patrick J, Price, Malcolm James, Mitchell, Holly D and Soldan, Kate (2021) What Do Diagnoses of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease in Specialist Sexual Health Services in England Tell Us About Chlamydia Control? The Journal of infectious diseases, 224 (Supple). S113-S120. ISSN 1537-6613.

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Official URL: https://jid.oxfordjournals.org/

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an outcome measure for the evaluation of chlamydia screening programs. We explore PID diagnoses in specialist sexual health services (SSHSs) in England to inform the evaluation of the National Chlamydia Screening Programme, which was implemented nationally in 2008.

METHODS

We conducted descriptive analyses using data on diagnoses of PID-with and without Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and/or Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC)-by age and year of birth, in SSHSs between 2009 and 2019 from the GUMCAD STI Surveillance System database. Rates were calculated per 100 000 females residing in England.

RESULTS

CT screening activity peaked in 2010. The rates of all PID diagnoses decreased between 2009 and 2019 by 39%. CT-associated PID (CT-PID) declined by 58%, and nonspecific PID declined by 37%. GC-PID increased by 34%. CT-PID decreased across all age groups with the highest observed decline, 71%, in 15- to 19-year-olds. A dose-response relationship was observed between CT-PID rates and screening, with rates lowest in those with the greatest exposure to screening.

CONCLUSIONS

There was a marked decline in diagnoses of CT-PID, and nonspecific PID, at SSHSs after the introduction of widespread chlamydia screening, whereas GC-PID diagnoses increased. This ecological trend was broadly consistent with what we would have expected to see if widespread screening reduced the incidence of chlamydia-associated PID (and of nonspecific PID), as has been observed in randomized controlled trials of screening.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: W Public health. Health statistics. Occupational health. Health education
WC Communicabable diseases
Divisions: Womens and Childrens > Gynaecology
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Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 25 Aug 2021 13:33
Last Modified: 25 Aug 2021 13:33
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/4574

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