Risk factors for surgical site infection after groin hernia repair: does the mesh or technique matter?

Christou, N, Ris, F, Naumann, David N, Robert-Yap, J, Mathonnet, M and Gillion, J-F (2021) Risk factors for surgical site infection after groin hernia repair: does the mesh or technique matter? Hernia : the journal of hernias and abdominal wall surgery. ISSN 1248-9204. This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs

Full text not available from this repository.
Official URL: http://link.springer.com/journal/10029

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Surgical site infections (SSIs) following groin hernia repair (GHR) are getting rarer in high income countries despite a wider use of meshes. Among the risk factors for SSIs, those related to the mesh and the surgical technique have rarely been described.

METHODS

A registry-based multicenter study using prospectively collected data, including SSIs and their potential risk factors, was conducted in the French Hernia-Club.

RESULTS

Between 2012 and 2019, 21,976 consecutive unselected adult patients aged 64.8  ±  15.4 years old (88.9% male) underwent GHR (83.5% unilateral). Fifty four percent were laparoscopic; 97.6% used mesh. The overall incidence of SSI was 0.26%. The incidence of SSI was respectively, 0.24% and 0.19% (p  =  0.420) in open vs laparoscopic repairs; 0.19% and 0.25% (p  =  0.638) for polyester vs polypropylene mesh; In adjusted multivariate analysis focusing on macroporous meshes (which were the most implanted meshes: 23,148 out of 24,099), there were no differences in terms of SSIs' rates regarding the technique: open versus laparoscopy (p  =  0.762) nor the type of mesh used: polypropylene versus polyester (p  =  0.557).

CONCLUSION

The rate of SSI following GHR was low in this large registry study. Mesh type and surgical technique did not affect SSIs rates. Caution is advised when interpreting these data due to this very low rate of SSI and the potential for a type II error.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students via ASK Discovery tool http://tinyurl.com/z795c8c by using their UHB Athens login IDs
Subjects: WI Digestive system. Gastroenterology
WO Surgery
Divisions: Clinical Support > Infection Control
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 12 Oct 2021 13:07
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2021 13:07
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/4700

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item