Sexual exposure and sexual behaviour in the interval between gonorrhoea treatment and test of cure: a cross-sectional cohort study.

Ayinde, Oluseyi and Ross, Jonathan D C (2021) Sexual exposure and sexual behaviour in the interval between gonorrhoea treatment and test of cure: a cross-sectional cohort study. Sexually transmitted infections. ISSN 1472-3263. This article is available to all UHB staff and students using a UHB Athens Account. Register for Athens here-http://openathens.nice.org.uk/

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Official URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/journals/178/

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We explored sexual contact in the interval between the treatment for gonorrhoea and attending for a test of cure (ToC) and identified factors associated with sexual contact in this period.

METHODS

Multivariable analysis of demographic, behavioural and clinical data with self-reported sexual contact prior to attending for a gonorrhoea ToC evaluation among participants recruited into the 'Gentamicin for the Treatment of Gonorrhoea' trial in England, between October 2014 and November 2016. Associations with sexual contact were expressed as prevalence ratios (PR) and their corresponding 95% CI.

RESULTS

The median time to ToC was 15 days (interquartile range 14-20 days). 197/540 (37%) participants reported sexual contact in the time between treatment and ToC. Of these, 173/197 (88%) participants reported inconsistent condom use, including with previous partners (133/197 (68%)). A history of gonorrhoea (adjusted PR (aPR) 1.32 (1.03 to 1.69)) or syphilis (aPR 1.19 (1.08 to 1.32)), being in regular (aPR 1.71 (1.41 to 2.09)) sexual relationships, high number of partners in the last 3 months (aPR 1.77 (1.25 to 2.51))-'more than 5 partners' vs '0 to 1 partner', and attending for a ToC more than 14 days after treatment (aPR 1.40 (1.08 to 1. 81)) were associated with reporting sexual contact before the ToC appointment. However, age (aPR (1.00 (0.99 to 1.01)) and presenting with specific symptoms at baseline (aPR 1.17 (0.95 to 1.44)) were not associated with sexual contact by the ToC attendance.

CONCLUSION

Sexual activity after receiving treatment for gonorrhoea and prior to a ToC evaluation was common. This was associated with previous infection history and specific behavioural characteristics. Knowledge of these factors can help guide safe sex counselling at the time of treatment.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to all UHB staff and students using a UHB Athens Account. Register for Athens here-http://openathens.nice.org.uk/
Subjects: HQ Sex. Relationships. Marriage. The family
WC Communicabable diseases
Divisions: Clinical Support > Infectious Diseases
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jamie Edgar
Date Deposited: 15 Nov 2021 14:25
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2021 14:25
URI: http://www.repository.uhblibrary.co.uk/id/eprint/4821

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